A Storm Goddess' Thoughts

Thorsdottir's Thoughts and Gatherings

552,696 notes

Women do not have to:

clemlin:

vegankatie:

  • be thin
  • give birth
  • cook for you
  • have long hair
  • wear makeup
  • have sex with you
  • be feminine
  • be graceful
  • shave
  • diet
  • be fashionable
  • wear pink
  • love men
  • be the media’s idea of perfection
  • listen to your bullshit
  • have a vagina

This is very true, but it’s important to remember that if a woman is feminine, graceful, shaves, diets, wears make up, or does any of these things in the list, it doesn’t make her a slave to patriarchy or any less of a feminist than you.

BLESS.

(Source: defendfeminism, via lost-and-so-not-found)

363 notes

You see that girl? The one reading her favorite book for the eighth time? She’s a keeper. How do I know this? Because the way she flips each page as if she’s never done it before should tell you that she’ll love you each day as if she’ll never get tired of it.
(via c0ntemplations)

(via lost-and-so-not-found)

48 notes

ancientcoins:

Silver Penny of Olof Tribute-King of Sweden, 990s CE, minted in Sweden in imitation of the coinage of Ethelred II of England

Ancient Scandinavia, though aware of coinage from areas as far distant as Sassanian Persia, was slow to adopt the use of coinage itself, preferring to use un-struck silver bullion or coins of other countries as it’s currency. Viking raids on England in the 980s encouraged the silver-rich English to bribe King Olof to stop the attacks, which flooded modern Sweden with large numbers of coins. This encouraged the Scandinavian kings to begin to strike their own coins, modeled on those of the English. The coins coincided with the gradual solidification of separate kingdoms in Norway, Sweden, and Denmark, so we see the names of the local rulers on the coins

The portrait may appear crude but is actually a fair rendering in comparison with other contemporary coinages, it is, however, an imitation of Ethelred’s portrait, rather than a representation of Olof. The lettering at this time was done through the use of triangular punches, which explains its strange, blocky character. The reverse shows the cross, indicating the spread of Christianity which was slowly coming to Scandinavia at this time.

(via guthbrand)

3,349 notes

fuckyeahpaganism:

In Norse mythology, Huginn (“thought”) Muninn (“memory”) are a pair of ravens that fly all over the world, Midgard, to bring information to the god Odin. In the Poetic Edda, a disguised Odin expresses that he fears that they may not return from their daily flights. The Prose Edda explains that Odin is referred to as “raven-god” due to his association with Huginn and Muninn, who are described as perching on his shoulders. Odin also gave the ravens the ability to speak.
(x)

fuckyeahpaganism:

In Norse mythology, Huginn (“thought”) Muninn (“memory”) are a pair of ravens that fly all over the world, Midgard, to bring information to the god Odin. In the Poetic Edda, a disguised Odin expresses that he fears that they may not return from their daily flights. The Prose Edda explains that Odin is referred to as “raven-god” due to his association with Huginn and Muninn, who are described as perching on his shoulders. Odin also gave the ravens the ability to speak.

(x)

(via thewellandspindle)

1,938 notes

havoc305:

My Favorite God/giant from Norse mythology. Fenrir. Son of Loki and destined to kill Odin during Ragnorok. So powerful he was captured but was tricked into it because no God was able to stand up to him. Gotta love that.

(via thewellandspindle)